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The World’s Best-Selling Server Meets Its Perfect Match

first_imgWe first introduced our Dell OpenManage Essentials systems management console in the spring of 2012. By November of that same year, over 40,000 customers had registered to download the software. By July of 2016, OpenManage Essentials expanded into network management to become a game-changing, essential data center resource.Through years of updates and enhancements, users have consistently relied on OpenManage Essentials for:Comprehensive monitoring of their Dell EMC and third-party infrastructureAutomation of critical, and frequent IT management tasksContinuous availability of Dell EMC PowerEdge serversNow that Dell EMC PowerEdge is officially the world’s best-selling server, aligning our number one servers with a world-class IT infrastructure management solution is more important than ever.Meet the Next Generation of OpenManage Essentials: Dell EMC OpenManage Enterprise  Designed for the modern IT architecture, our new Dell EMC OpenManage Enterprise systems management console radically simplifies, automates and unifies infrastructure management tasks. It utilizes an intelligent user interface to maximize data center productivity and helps achieve greater cost-effectiveness by accelerating hardware optimization, reliability, and uptime.Developed on a completely redesigned architecture and engineered on CentOS with a PostgreSQL database, no additional operating system or database licenses are required for use with the new console. OpenManage Enterprise is also packaged and delivered as a virtual appliance supporting ESXI, Hyper-V and KVM for use in multiple environments including Linux, and Microsoft.An updated HTML5 GUI and powerful search engine provide faster performance and response times while also unifying lifecycle management of critical Dell EMC PowerEdge tower, rack and modular platforms. Centralized role-based access and control help ensure that your IT infrastructure assets are covered and maintained in alignment with the priorities, skills, and assignment of IT staff.Take Control With Operational Simplicity and Intelligent AutomationIntelligent automation is the key to a successful IT transformation. It helps reduce development time, maximize resources, and drastically lowers the cost of infrastructure management. To this end, OpenManage Enterprise employs a comprehensive north-bound RESTful API to enable intelligent automation and solution integration.To minimize infrastructure downtime and reduce human error, it’s now easier than ever to establish and maintain one or multiple firmware baselines for groups of PowerEdge servers – and also easy to automate updates on non-compliant firmware.With a scalable architecture and powerful integrated security, PowerEdge servers are truly the bedrock of the modern data center. Add to that the intelligent automation provided by OpenManage Enterprise and you have the tools to push innovation further and faster than ever to achieve your IT transformation goals.OpenManage Enterprise Tech Release is available for download today. For product details and extensive documentation, visit dell.com/openmanage and OpenManage Enterprise Tech Center.last_img read more

US police weigh officer discipline after rally, Capitol riot

first_imgPolice departments across the country are reviewing the behavior of dozens of officers who were in Washington on the day of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol. An Associated Press review finds at least 31 officers are being scrutinized or face criminal charges tied to the Jan. 6 events in the nation’s capital. Most haven’t been publicly identified and only a few have been charged. Experts say it’s up to police chiefs to strike a balance between maintaining their officers’ First Amendment rights and dealing with community mistrust of those officers who were on the scene in Washington.last_img read more

3 male guards accused in violent attack at NJ women’s prison

first_imgTRENTON, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey’s attorney general said Thursday that three prison guards are charged with misconduct stemming from a violent attack on at least six inmates at the state’s lone women’s prison. He says one women was punched 28 times and pepper-sprayed. Attorney General Gurbir Grewal said prosecutors found that the guards tried to cover up the attack at the Edna Mahan Correctional Facility for Women by filing false reports. He said the January attack involved about two dozen guards. Grewal said Thursday the investigation was still in its early stages but that the initial charges were meant as a deterrent.last_img read more

Biden says ‘erratic’ Trump shouldn’t get intel briefings

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden says Donald Trump’s “erratic behavior” should prevent him from receiving classified intelligence briefings, a courtesy that historically has been granted to outgoing presidents. Asked in an interview with CBS News on Friday what he feared if Trump continued to receive the briefings, Biden said he did not want to “speculate out loud.” But he made clear he did not want Trump to continue to receive the briefings. Whether to give a past president intelligence briefings is solely the current officeholder’s prerogative. Trump’s second impeachment trial is set to begin next week.last_img read more

With Carnival scrapped, Rio’s Sambadrome hosts vaccinations

first_imgRIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a normal year, Rio de Janeiro’s Sambadrome would be preparing for its great moment of the year: the world’s most famous Carnival parade. But a week before what should be the start of Carnival, the pandemic has replaced pageantry. The great celebration has been put on hold until next year as Rio struggles to quash a rise in COVID-19 cases. The city on Saturday opened a drive-thru immunization station at the Sambadrome, where a line of cars queued up on a broad avenue built for floats. Officials warn they’ll have no tolerance for those who try to celebrate with open street parades or clandestine parties.last_img read more

Members recommend medical amnesty policy

first_imgCampus Life Council (CLC) passed a recommendation to include a medical amnesty policy in du Lac while also debating progressive discipline and the levels of administrative action at its meeting Monday.Council members passed the medical amnesty recommendation with a 12-1 vote. The policy would prevent a student seeking medical treatment for a friend from getting in trouble with the Office of Residence Life and Housing (ORLH).Controversy over the policy in past meetings caused the recommendation to be revised and represented to CLC at Monday’s meeting.“Students would at least know that this would be kept in consideration,” student body president Grant Schmidt said. “I feel that these revised points attest to that.”The new recommendation suggests a medical amnesty policy be established “that, under normal circumstances, allows students to report emergencies without automatically incurring a disciplinary record.” The ultimate decision on whether to adapt this policy will be left up to ORLH, Schmidt said.Council members also discussed how to best keep discipline at the lowest administrative level, which is often a student’s dorm.“This recommendation is about keeping things in the realm of the people who know students most closely,” student body vice president Cynthia Weber said.Weber said this policy would allow students to avoid an unnecessary disciplinary record when a rector could deal with a minor offense instead of sending the student to ORLH. Several of the rectors on the council objected to the lack of clarity in the definition for this recommendation.“I am a structure guy,” Fr. Pete McCormick, rector of Keough Hall, said. “I don’t see the structure here and I’m worried about the message that gets sent that [discipline] will always get kicked back to the rector.” The recommendation would free the hands of ORLH by giving more room for discretion, Judicial Council president Ian Secviar said. It would also be in keeping with the goal of pastoral care that is central to the philosophy behind residence life at Notre Dame, he said.Zahm House rector Corry Colonna said CLC should not assume that sending a student to ORLH for discipline negates the educative role of the rector.Council member Gus Gari said there was a need to recognize that the policy of referring discipline to the rector would work as “an exception rather than a norm.”CLC members will review the recommendation and represent it to the council next week.Council members also agreed to recommend that the new issue of du Lac should clarify the undergraduate tailgating policy.The suggested change asks that individual students who wish to host a tailgate may do so without consulting the Student Activities Office, Schmidt said. CLC will invite Bill Kirk, associate vice president of Residence Life, to its next meeting in order to hear its recommendations and continue its discussion on du Lac revisions.last_img read more

New campus club spreads ‘kiNDness’

first_imgThe new semester welcomes to campus the new student organization, kiND Club, which focuses on performing random acts of kindness and spreading positive affirmations.“The overarching goal for the club is to create an infectious display of kindness on campus and in the community. … We want to use the concept of kindness to help, heal and educate,” Stephanie Gaal, assistant professional specialist in the Physical Education and Wellness Department, said.Gaal was instrumental in starting the club, which is a division of the Random Acts of Kindness Foundation. She proposed the idea to students in one of her Contemporary Topics classes last semester. Sophomore Elaine Schmidt, who now serves as the club’s president, was one of the first students to show interest and participate in kiND’s official founding.“We’re really just people that want to get together to do nice things for others,” Schmidt said. “Taking a few minutes each day to do something nice for someone else keeps you centered and helps you remember what’s really important in life.”Before attaining full club status last spring, kiND organizers wrote positive affirmations on Post It notes and placed them on dining hall trays for their first random act of kindness, or RAK, Schmidt said. The club also posted flyers in the Hesburgh Library with tear-away strips of encouraging words during finals week.After receiving 319 sign-ups from Activities Night, Schmidt said kiND is ready to take it to the next level this school year. The club will host meetings every other Thursday at 8 p.m., during which they will plan regular, communal RAKs. Schmidt said they could be as simple as giving compliments in classes or as elaborate as a campus-wide flash mob dance to brighten people’s day. She said one of kiND’s first RAKs of the semester is planned for Wednesday.“This is really a grassroots club,” Schmidt said. “The members will have a big say in the kinds of events and RAKs we do, which is something that is really cool about our club. Everyone can contribute.”Gaal said the club is also planning a fundraiser with Notes to Self, a company that designs socks with positive affirmations written on them. The company was founded by Schmidt’s mother.“At Notre Dame, we are so busy. It’s nice to take a breath and remember what’s most important,” senior Sarah Very, who recently joined the club, said. “We can make a difference through acts of kindness, and it’s good to have something to remind us.”The next kiND Club meeting will be held Sept. 25 in a to-be-determined room in Debartolo Hall. Students interested can e-mail kind@nd.edu to join the listserv and “like” the club Facebook page to stay up-to-date on organized RAKs.Tags: Kindness, random acts of kindness, Random Acts of Kindness Foundationlast_img read more

Saint Mary’s senior reflects on time as student football manager

first_imgUpon arriving to campus her first year, Saint Mary’s senior Ashley DeJonge said she knew she wanted to participate in the football student managing program. “I knew about the student managing program before I even stepped on campus as a student,” DeJonge said in an email. “I know a couple people who were involved as a manager for other sports and spoke very highly of the program, so I thought I’d give it a try.”Students interested in the program must join during their freshman year, so DeJonge began her involvement during her first year of studies. “I’ve been a manager for the football team since my freshman year,” she said. “That’s when anyone who is interested needs to get involved because of the way continuing on in the program works.”Within the program, she works both practices and games in order to assist the team. “We work every practice and walk-through the team has, set up the locker room before game days and work on the sidelines of the home games,” DeJonge said. “Some of us even get the opportunity to travel to all the away games.”DeJonge said her participation in the football management program has given her an introduction into the sports industry — a field in which she said she hopes to continue working after graduation.“My dream is to work in the sports industry someday, so I felt this would be a great opportunity to get involved with an athletic program and to build my resume,” she added. In addition to building her resume, football management has taught her about all of the work that goes into a game day, she said. “I love getting to see everything that happens behind the scenes,” DeJonge said. “I’ve learned so much about an athletic team and its program that I would have never imagined goes into a game day production.”However, there are also obstacles that come with working in the field, DeJonge said. “At times being a female in this position presents a challenge where I’m unable to help out in areas that are needed, such as having to be in the locker room. But these situations definitely have not hindered my ability to work in this program,” she said.Nonetheless, DeJonge said her experience at Saint Mary’s has given her the confidence to continue working in the field. “Saint Mary’s really prides themselves on empowering women, so this mentality has helped me succeed in a male-dominant position,” she said. If any first year students have an interest in joining, DeJonge said she recommends they give it a try. Any freshmen that would like to become involved are welcome to send her an email, she said. “Even if you are on the line about it, sign up and work a practice,” DeJonge said. “Every freshman will have the opportunity to work practices and some will even get lucky enough to work a game. It’s an amazing opportunity no matter how long your experience is.”Tags: football manager, SMC football manager, student managerlast_img read more

Sorin and Walsh Halls experience water outage

first_imgSorin and Walsh Halls experienced a water outage Wednesday and are awaiting testing to ensure the water is drinkable, according to emails sent to the dorm communities.At 1:56 p.m. Wednesday, Sorin residents received an email from their rector, Fr. Bob Loughery, informing them that the water was out in both Sorin and Walsh Halls and that the toilets were not usable. University spokesperson Dennis Brown said water was restored to the buildings Wednesday evening.“Sediment in the water main that serves these residence halls constricted the water flow to both buildings,” he said in an email. “The line has been cleared and was returned to service about 9 p.m. Wednesday. The line has been flushed twice, and water samples have been taken for each building.”The outage was connected to Corby Hall construction, according to the email sent from Loughery to Sorin residents Wednesday.“Water to Sorin and Walsh was diverted to another pipe after the start of construction,” Loughery said in the email. “Though the pipe was able to handle that water usage during the summer, the pipe was not able to support the sudden surge in usage these past couple days.”In an email to Sorin and Walsh residents Wednesday, the Residential Life Team said Campus Utilities staff had been working throughout the day to restore water and would test the water “[o]ut of an abundance of caution.”Bottled water was delivered to the dorms to ensure access to potable water during testing. Badin and St. Edward’s Halls opened their bathrooms to Walsh and Sorin while their showers and toilets were impacted by the water outage.Brown said the University expects to receive the test results Friday afternoon.Tags: Construction, Sorin Hall, Walsh Hall, water outagelast_img read more

Tony Award winner Sutton Foster visits Saint Mary’s College

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Hannah Toepp Renowned performer Sutton Foster answers questions Monday evening during an appearance at Saint Mary’s College.“We want to bring in well known Broadway powerhouses in order to motivate and inspire students in our musical theater minor” Mark Albin, the administrative assistant for communications, dance and theater department, said.Some of the other visitors have been women like Glenn Close, Audra McDonald and Sigourney Weaver, senior theater major Stephanie Johnson explained.Along with her question-and-answer session, Foster hosted a masterclass for students in which she discussed musical theater and helped students workshop their pieces.Albin explained that there were about 40 students — from Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and local high schools — present in the masterclass.Johnson, who attended the masterclass and was able to sing for Foster, talked about the impact Foster’s visit had on her.“Theater has always been a part of my life,” Johnson said. “I think it’s valuable as a young artist to learn about the personal struggle of other artists. And it’s very inspiring to see someone who works against the stereotypes for female roles and allows women to be quirky or even gross without it being seen as a fault.”Foster’s presentation was an entertaining interview style. Foster said her own inspiration came from comic powerhouses like Lucille Ball and Carol Burnett.“In so many musicals, women are the victims. Their songs emphasize the sort of woe is me, I have nothing attitude. I just find that boring,” Foster said. “I want to see strength and action in female characters. I want characters who are ready to take their heartbreak and actively fight against it.”Foster also discussed the impact an actor can have on a role, and how a role can change the actor or actress.“There are a lot of cases where I end up changing the key a song is sung in. Or they end up changing a word because I can sing something else better,” she said. “I think a lot of people are afraid they won’t live up to someone else who played the role, but everyone brings something new to a role, and we’re just constantly working and figuring things out.”Foster ended the night with some advice for students who are about to graduate and move into the real world.“Be gentle and patient with yourselves. Your 20s are a decade of firsts, first house, first full time job, first love, first plant,” she said.She also had some advice on jobs and trying new things.“Don’t let rejection defeat you — let it fuel you,” Foster said. “Don’t think too much about what you’re going to do, just leap into your life. And then figure out.“ … Say yes to every opportunity that comes your way, except for porn.”Tags: Broadway, Margaret Hill Endowment, masterclass, Sutton Foster Saint Mary’s College community members, from professors to therapy dogs, filled O’Laughlin Auditorium Monday evening to see two-time Tony Award winning actress, singer and dancer Sutton Foster speak.Foster’s visit is the latest in a series of guest artists visits made possible by the Margaret Hill Endowment.last_img read more