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A comparison of the probability distribution of observed substorm magnitude with that predicted by a minimal substorm model

first_imgWe compare the probability distributions of substorm magnetic bay magnitudes from observations and a minimal substorm model. The observed distribution was derived previously and independently using the IL index from the IMAGE magnetometer network. The model distribution is derived from a synthetic AL index time series created using real solar wind data and a minimal substorm model, which was previously shown to reproduce observed substorm waiting times. There are two free parameters in the model which scale the contributions to AL from the directly-driven DP2 electrojet and loading-unloading DP1 electrojet, respectively. In a limited region of the 2-D parameter space of the model, the probability distribution of modelled substorm bay magnitudes is not significantly different to the observed distribution. The ranges of the two parameters giving acceptable (95% confidence level) agreement are consistent with expectations using results from other studies. The approximately linear relationship between the two free parameters over these ranges implies that the substorm magnitude simply scales linearly with the solar wind power input at the time of substorm onset.last_img read more

MV Cape Ray Starts Neutralizing Syrian Chemicals

first_img MV Cape Ray Starts Neutralizing Syrian Chemicals View post tag: Chemicals Authorities View post tag: americas View post tag: Syrian View post tag: News by topic Teams aboard the MV Cape Ray have begun neutralizing Syrian chemical materials, a Pentagon spokesman said yesterday. View post tag: starts Back to overview,Home naval-today MV Cape Ray Starts Neutralizing Syrian Chemicals View post tag: MV Cape Ray U.S. military and civilian specialists aboard the ship are neutralizing the chemical materials in international waters, Army Col. Steve Warren told reporters.The ship left Gioia Tauro, Italy, with 600 tons of chemicals.“The Cape Ray is tasked with neutralization of specific chemical material from Syria,” Warren said, noting that the teams are following United Nations and Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons guidelines.If all goes well, he said, neutralization will take about 60 days. Weather could affect the process, he added.The U.S. ship has two field-deployable hydrolysis systems in its holds. The systems mix the chemicals in a titanium reactor to render them inert.“When neutralization is complete, Cape Ray will deliver the result effluent by-products to Finland and Germany for destruction ashore,” Warren said.Italian officials loaded 78 containers of Syrian chemical materials aboard the Cape Ray on July 2. The Cape Ray teams will neutralize HD sulfur mustard gas and DF, a sarin gas precursor.[mappress]Press Release, July 08, 2014; Image: US DoD View post tag: Neutralizing View post tag: Navy View post tag: middle east View post tag: Naval July 8, 2014 Share this articlelast_img read more

“READERS FORUM” OCTOBER 30, 2016

first_imgWHATS ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays “READERS POLL” question is: If the election was held today for Governor of Indiana who you vote for?Please take time and read our newest feature articles entitled “IU WOMEN’S-MENS SWIM AND DIVING TEAMS.Also take time to read “BIRTHDAYS, HOT JOBS” and “LOCAL SPORTS” posted in our sections.If you would like to advertise in the CCO please contact us City-County [email protected] County Observer has been serving our community for 15 years.Copyright 2015 City County Observer. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistribute.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Bakery to open on site of former pub

first_imgAt the height of their decline, pubs were closing at the rate of 35 a week thanks to the introduction of the smoking ban.That has now slowed down to 12 boozers a week now shutting up shop.But, in the ultimate sign-of-the-times, one bakery chain is benefiting from the slowdown in British pubs.Le Pain Quotidien, the BB75 Belgian bakery and café concept, is set to open its first bakery in a former pub, after taking on the lease of an Enterprise Inns-owned site in North LondonThe chain, which earlier this year opened its 20th site in the UK, in Soho’s Wardour Street, is believed to have secured a lease on the Rose & Crown in Highgate, according to M&C Report, a sister title of British Baker.The company, which was founded in Brussels by chef Alain Coumont in 1990, is set to re-open the site over the summer. The bakery-café group currently operates more than 170 shops in 26 cities and 16 countries worldwide.last_img read more

Dopapod Light Designer Luke Stratton Debuts “The Light Side Podcast” With Guest Jefferson Waful [Listen]

first_imgOne of the most sensational components of live music is the light design. With improvisational bands in particular, Light Designers must configure their craft in such a way to match the music in its free flowing element. For fans who want to know more about this fascinating trade, you can now tune into the new Light Side Podcast, hosted by Dopapod light designer Luke Stratton.The Light Side Podcast will see Stratton talk about the inner workings of light design with a series of esteemed workers in the field. The series was launched today, and the debut episode features Umphrey’s McGee LD Jefferson Waful. The two discuss preparation and design, equipment, console layout, and Waful’s journey into the world of lighting design. Stratton plans to release one episode of Light Side per month, and future guests include Greg “The Laser Shark” Ellis of Pretty Lights, Saxton Waller of ROY G BIV Light and Show Design (STS9), and Michael Smalley of Twin Designs (Bassnectar, Pitbull).You can listen to the debut episode streaming below, and head here for more information about the series.You can catch Luke Stratton on tour with Dopapod throughout 2016 and into 2017, including tour dates with Pigeons Playing Ping Pong and a two-night New Year’s Eve celebration with Aqueous and Consider The Source at the Madison Theater in Covington, KY. The band’s full schedule appears on their official website.last_img read more

Kristin Stoklosa receives Ishimoto Award

first_imgKristin Stoklosa, e-resources manager and e-resources coordinator for the sciences, has been named this year’s recipient of the 2010 Carol Ishimoto Award for Distinguished Service in the Harvard College Library.Created through a 1991 endowment established by former Associate Librarian of Harvard College for Cataloging and Processing Carol Ishimoto, the award annually recognizes a member or group of the professional staff who has advanced the mission of the Library through exceptional contributions and leadership, and includes a cash award and citation for creative professional achievement of the highest order. “Kristin’s dedication has had a positive impact not just on Harvard College Library users, but on patrons throughout Harvard’s libraries,” Cline said. “The availability of digital resources has profoundly transformed the way our users approach the library, and Kristin has played a key role in ensuring the libraries acquire and deliver the resources patrons want. Her efforts in ensuring patrons can access the material they need for their studies and research is deserving of this award.” Stoklosa was nominated for the award in recognition of her efforts to anticipate and respond to the complex and rapidly-changing needs of scholars and faculty who rely on the library’s ability to deliver timely, accessible and reliable digital resources.To deliver a wide range of e-resources as quickly and efficiently as possible, Stoklosa has taken on a variety of roles in her work, Alison Scott, Widener senior collection development librarian and Charles Warren Bibliographer for American History, wrote in a nomination she submitted on behalf of herself and Associate Librarian for Collection Development Dan Hazen. Stoklosa acts as a combination of negotiator, analyst, ambassador, project manager, wrangler, and even rhetorician while assisting bibliographers and libraries that are variously part of HCL, FAS and HUL to assess, purchase, license, and subscribe to e-resources ranging from massive multi-disciplinary journal packages to highly-specific primary data sources.As an example of Stoklosa’s exemplary work, Scott pointed to her management of all subscription data during the project to migrate more than 1,000 printed journals at Widener Library into digital formats. Other projects include gathering and analyzing data for e-journal package negotiations and acquisitions, and an extensive review of tools for the evaluation of journal significance completed in support of the arduous work of pricing evaluation. Stoklosa also played a lead role in the development of a software tool/database for the efficient management of all phases of HCL acquisition of new digital resources, and continues to work on developing efficient workflows for the purchase of one-off e-books.“These activities would not be easy tasks to accomplish even in the best of times,” Scott said. “In these days of straitened budgets and ever-increasing costs, Kristin’s ability to work with librarians, technical experts, and vendors to keep our electronic acquisitions programs on track, on schedule and within budget is nothing short of marvelous.”Nancy Cline, Roy E. Larsen Librarian of Harvard College, presented the award to Stoklosa on Dec. 7.last_img read more

Herb Garden

first_imgUniversity of Georgia horticulturist Bodie Pennisi doesn’t just study herbs in her research garden in Griffin, Ga. She also grows them at home to add flavor to her food.“I grow herbs because I use them in my kitchen,” she said, “and I do quite a bit of cooking. I use them fresh, and I use them dry, so I have to know which will grow in containers [and] in the ground, how to preserve them and use them the best.”Her general message is to “eat more herbs,” she said. “Using herbs in the kitchen is a dietary way to help yourself in not eating too much salt and increasing the flavor in your food.”All herbs like well-drained soils, so she’s found it easiest – and better for the plants – to grow them in pots. The exceptions are rosemary and thyme, which can be planted as ground cover in sunny areas. Sage can also be grown in the ground, but Pennisi has found, “in my view, it likes the pot a little bit better.”Because herbs grow well in pots, they are easy to transport indoors and back outdoors depending on the weather. “You can grow just about anything if you put it in the house,” she said, “but you have to give it a lot of sun. A southern-exposure window is the best. But, you’re never going to get the good growth you get outside.”Both dried and fresh herbs can be found at most grocery stores. Dried herbs usually come in bottles. Fresh herbs can be found in the produce section, usually bunched, in a bag or enclosed in a tube. But Pennisi prefers hers grown at home. And in the winter when fresh isn’t readily available, she’s prepared.“It’s a lot better if you grow them yourself,” she said. “And dry them yourself, but don’t hold them dried for more than a year. I dry my own lemon balm and mint for tea. It’s not hard.”To dry herbs, she uses an inexpensive plastic dehydrator. In the summer when the air inside her house is dry due to the air conditioning, she hangs them in her kitchen.Below are a few of Pennisi’s favorite herbs and a few tips for growing them.Basil. “You can start from seed or purchase it in plant form,” she said. Basil can vary from the most common – a wide-leafed variety – to the small-leafed lemon basil and purple opal basil, which has dark maroon-purple leaves. It should be grown in full sun and well-drained soil. As soon as its flower heads appear, these should be pinched back to prevent the plant from going to seed.Thyme. There are more than 400 varieties of thyme, with English thyme being the most common. For the South, Pennisi suggests growing lemon thyme, caraway thyme and mother-of-thyme. Thyme varieties that creep make an excellent ground cover.Sage. A perennial plant, sage varieties can be used interchangeably in cooking. Once it is established, it usually does well in well-drained soils. One particular variety of sage, known as pineapple sage, can be used to flavor drinks, chicken dishes, cheeses, jams and jellies.Rosemary. Rosemary can be enjoyed year-round from the garden, because it too is a perennial plant. The shrubby plant can grow to between 3 and 5 feet tall. It’s drought-resistant after it’s established, but should be planted in full sun. “If you see that the plant is not growing vigorously, it’s a sign that it’s not getting enough sun,” Pennisi said.Mint. Mint should always be grown in a pot, she said, because once it’s planted in the ground, it can take over. “The same goes for oregano and marjoram,” she said. “They’re a little too happy to grow.” The invasive mint can tolerate partial shade. Pennisi likes to grow peppermint and spearmint varieties to add to her tea.Winter and summer savory. Winter savory has smaller, darker green leaves, a stronger flavor and is a perennial. It grows best from cuttings. Summer savory grows more easily from seed. Both require full sun.Chives. Chives are a member of the onion family. “It’s basically your onion,” she said. “Onion chives are planted each year. The garlic chives have flat leaves, and they’re perennial.” They are easy to grow, but require a balanced fertilizer to grow well. Onion chives have pink flowers, while garlic chives have white flowers.Lemon balm. “I like lemon balm for tea,” she said. Lemon balm is a perennial that can spread up to 3 feet. It will grow in partial shade.For more information on growing herbs in Georgia, see UGA Extension Bulletin 1170.last_img read more

North Carolina campground closures across state park system to continue through May 22

first_imgVirginia becomes first state in South to pledge goal of carbon-free energy Georgia denies the nation’s last new coal plant North Carolina campground closures across state park system to continue through May 22 “Please do not call the reservation line or the park about your reservation,” NC State Parks said on their Facebook page. “If your reservation falls within the campground closure dates, Aspira, our reservations management company, will contact you directly to cancel your reservation and issue a full refund.” In the shadow of the coronavirus pandemic, Virginia is moving ahead with the goal of becoming carbon-free by 2045, the Washington Post reports. Last weekend, Gov. Ralph Northam signed legislation which mandates Dominion Energy, the state’s largest utility, to switch to renewable energy by 2045. Appalachian Power, which provides energy to southwest Virginia, must be carbon-free by 2050. “I am thankful for the EPD’s decision so we can move on from this outdated and unnecessary project,” Katherine Cummings, a member of Georgia’s Fall-line Alliance for a Clean Environment (FACE) said in a statement. “Plant Washington posed a threat to family budgets, community health, and natural resources in and beyond Middle Georgia. It’s certainly a moment of closure and relief that this polluting giant will never be built.” The actions “Will create thousands of clean energy jobs, make major progress on fighting climate change, and break Virginia’s reliance on fossil fuels,” state Sen. Jennifer L. McClellan told the Washington Post in a statement.  On Friday, NC State Parks announced that state park campground closures will continue through May 22.  Last week, the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD) denied a request for additional time to begin construction on Plant Washington, a new coal plant that has been in the works for 12 years and would have cost more than $2 billion. It was the last proposed new coal power plant project in the United States.last_img read more

Freeport Man Charged With Drugs, Police Chase Crash

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Freeport man has been arrested for allegedly leading a New York State Trooper on a chase that ended when the suspect crashed his vehicle in South Hempstead this week, police said.Lawrence Brown was pulled over for weaving in and out of traffic while driving a Hyundai on the Southern State Parkway but fled while the trooper was approaching his vehicle to interview the suspect at about 3 a.m. Tuesday, police said.The 31-year-old suspect got off at exit 20 for Grand Avenue, where he crashed into a tree, got out of his vehicle and ran away, police said. Troopers found him hiding in the bushes nearby, police said.Troopers found three grams of cocaine, drug paraphernalia and a forged Visa debit card in the vehicle, police said.Brown was charged with possession of a forged instrument, possession of a controlled substance, fleeing a police officer and traffic violations.He will arraigned at First District Court in Hempstead.last_img read more

Binghamton students make ‘cents’ out of classroom lesson through coin drive

first_imgChallenge classes give students more opportunities outside the typical curriculum. “Our eighth grade challenge class, we’re talking about power throughout the year. The second half of the year we’re learning about how we can use our power to help people to make our community better,” said challenge teacher Janelle Farrell. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Some Binghamton students are making ‘cents’ of a lesson they learned in the classroom. “They’re going to look at the different side effects and the time they spend in chemo and give them things to kind of get them through that process,” said Farrell. “They need to know there’s people there to support them, and there’s people there who will help them,” said student Amiah Brissett. The money will be used to make care kits, filled with things to help patients feel better mentally and physically. “Some people can’t experience their life to the fullest so we think we should try to at least help some people live their life to the fullest,” said student Kaleb Lawrence. “I think in middle school its important especially, for kids to see that it’s not just them, it’s the outside world, and they can make a positive change in their community and have a voice,” said Farrell. “The kids have all experienced someone in their family or somebody in their lives that has had cancer. So we decided to research different areas of cancer, and decided to focus on chemo in particular,” said Farrell.center_img Students came up with the idea of a coin drive, raising money for people with cancer going through treatment. “We try to fix a problem at least once every year and this year it’s the chemo care,” said student Aidan Sheehan. A lesson kids are learning in school, but will stick with them outside of the halls. “We fill it up with things that help with the chemo care, either it could be money or could be equipment or anything,” said Sheehan. Students at East Middle School are also raising money for chemo care kits, through a different fundraiser. The drive runs until March 11, then students plan on delivering the kits to local oncology centers themselves. Students say it’s a small way of making a big difference.last_img read more

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