Month: January 2021

Members recommend medical amnesty policy

first_imgCampus Life Council (CLC) passed a recommendation to include a medical amnesty policy in du Lac while also debating progressive discipline and the levels of administrative action at its meeting Monday.Council members passed the medical amnesty recommendation with a 12-1 vote. The policy would prevent a student seeking medical treatment for a friend from getting in trouble with the Office of Residence Life and Housing (ORLH).Controversy over the policy in past meetings caused the recommendation to be revised and represented to CLC at Monday’s meeting.“Students would at least know that this would be kept in consideration,” student body president Grant Schmidt said. “I feel that these revised points attest to that.”The new recommendation suggests a medical amnesty policy be established “that, under normal circumstances, allows students to report emergencies without automatically incurring a disciplinary record.” The ultimate decision on whether to adapt this policy will be left up to ORLH, Schmidt said.Council members also discussed how to best keep discipline at the lowest administrative level, which is often a student’s dorm.“This recommendation is about keeping things in the realm of the people who know students most closely,” student body vice president Cynthia Weber said.Weber said this policy would allow students to avoid an unnecessary disciplinary record when a rector could deal with a minor offense instead of sending the student to ORLH. Several of the rectors on the council objected to the lack of clarity in the definition for this recommendation.“I am a structure guy,” Fr. Pete McCormick, rector of Keough Hall, said. “I don’t see the structure here and I’m worried about the message that gets sent that [discipline] will always get kicked back to the rector.” The recommendation would free the hands of ORLH by giving more room for discretion, Judicial Council president Ian Secviar said. It would also be in keeping with the goal of pastoral care that is central to the philosophy behind residence life at Notre Dame, he said.Zahm House rector Corry Colonna said CLC should not assume that sending a student to ORLH for discipline negates the educative role of the rector.Council member Gus Gari said there was a need to recognize that the policy of referring discipline to the rector would work as “an exception rather than a norm.”CLC members will review the recommendation and represent it to the council next week.Council members also agreed to recommend that the new issue of du Lac should clarify the undergraduate tailgating policy.The suggested change asks that individual students who wish to host a tailgate may do so without consulting the Student Activities Office, Schmidt said. CLC will invite Bill Kirk, associate vice president of Residence Life, to its next meeting in order to hear its recommendations and continue its discussion on du Lac revisions.last_img read more

New campus club spreads ‘kiNDness’

first_imgThe new semester welcomes to campus the new student organization, kiND Club, which focuses on performing random acts of kindness and spreading positive affirmations.“The overarching goal for the club is to create an infectious display of kindness on campus and in the community. … We want to use the concept of kindness to help, heal and educate,” Stephanie Gaal, assistant professional specialist in the Physical Education and Wellness Department, said.Gaal was instrumental in starting the club, which is a division of the Random Acts of Kindness Foundation. She proposed the idea to students in one of her Contemporary Topics classes last semester. Sophomore Elaine Schmidt, who now serves as the club’s president, was one of the first students to show interest and participate in kiND’s official founding.“We’re really just people that want to get together to do nice things for others,” Schmidt said. “Taking a few minutes each day to do something nice for someone else keeps you centered and helps you remember what’s really important in life.”Before attaining full club status last spring, kiND organizers wrote positive affirmations on Post It notes and placed them on dining hall trays for their first random act of kindness, or RAK, Schmidt said. The club also posted flyers in the Hesburgh Library with tear-away strips of encouraging words during finals week.After receiving 319 sign-ups from Activities Night, Schmidt said kiND is ready to take it to the next level this school year. The club will host meetings every other Thursday at 8 p.m., during which they will plan regular, communal RAKs. Schmidt said they could be as simple as giving compliments in classes or as elaborate as a campus-wide flash mob dance to brighten people’s day. She said one of kiND’s first RAKs of the semester is planned for Wednesday.“This is really a grassroots club,” Schmidt said. “The members will have a big say in the kinds of events and RAKs we do, which is something that is really cool about our club. Everyone can contribute.”Gaal said the club is also planning a fundraiser with Notes to Self, a company that designs socks with positive affirmations written on them. The company was founded by Schmidt’s mother.“At Notre Dame, we are so busy. It’s nice to take a breath and remember what’s most important,” senior Sarah Very, who recently joined the club, said. “We can make a difference through acts of kindness, and it’s good to have something to remind us.”The next kiND Club meeting will be held Sept. 25 in a to-be-determined room in Debartolo Hall. Students interested can e-mail [email protected] to join the listserv and “like” the club Facebook page to stay up-to-date on organized RAKs.Tags: Kindness, random acts of kindness, Random Acts of Kindness Foundationlast_img read more

Saint Mary’s senior reflects on time as student football manager

first_imgUpon arriving to campus her first year, Saint Mary’s senior Ashley DeJonge said she knew she wanted to participate in the football student managing program. “I knew about the student managing program before I even stepped on campus as a student,” DeJonge said in an email. “I know a couple people who were involved as a manager for other sports and spoke very highly of the program, so I thought I’d give it a try.”Students interested in the program must join during their freshman year, so DeJonge began her involvement during her first year of studies. “I’ve been a manager for the football team since my freshman year,” she said. “That’s when anyone who is interested needs to get involved because of the way continuing on in the program works.”Within the program, she works both practices and games in order to assist the team. “We work every practice and walk-through the team has, set up the locker room before game days and work on the sidelines of the home games,” DeJonge said. “Some of us even get the opportunity to travel to all the away games.”DeJonge said her participation in the football management program has given her an introduction into the sports industry — a field in which she said she hopes to continue working after graduation.“My dream is to work in the sports industry someday, so I felt this would be a great opportunity to get involved with an athletic program and to build my resume,” she added. In addition to building her resume, football management has taught her about all of the work that goes into a game day, she said. “I love getting to see everything that happens behind the scenes,” DeJonge said. “I’ve learned so much about an athletic team and its program that I would have never imagined goes into a game day production.”However, there are also obstacles that come with working in the field, DeJonge said. “At times being a female in this position presents a challenge where I’m unable to help out in areas that are needed, such as having to be in the locker room. But these situations definitely have not hindered my ability to work in this program,” she said.Nonetheless, DeJonge said her experience at Saint Mary’s has given her the confidence to continue working in the field. “Saint Mary’s really prides themselves on empowering women, so this mentality has helped me succeed in a male-dominant position,” she said. If any first year students have an interest in joining, DeJonge said she recommends they give it a try. Any freshmen that would like to become involved are welcome to send her an email, she said. “Even if you are on the line about it, sign up and work a practice,” DeJonge said. “Every freshman will have the opportunity to work practices and some will even get lucky enough to work a game. It’s an amazing opportunity no matter how long your experience is.”Tags: football manager, SMC football manager, student managerlast_img read more

Sorin and Walsh Halls experience water outage

first_imgSorin and Walsh Halls experienced a water outage Wednesday and are awaiting testing to ensure the water is drinkable, according to emails sent to the dorm communities.At 1:56 p.m. Wednesday, Sorin residents received an email from their rector, Fr. Bob Loughery, informing them that the water was out in both Sorin and Walsh Halls and that the toilets were not usable. University spokesperson Dennis Brown said water was restored to the buildings Wednesday evening.“Sediment in the water main that serves these residence halls constricted the water flow to both buildings,” he said in an email. “The line has been cleared and was returned to service about 9 p.m. Wednesday. The line has been flushed twice, and water samples have been taken for each building.”The outage was connected to Corby Hall construction, according to the email sent from Loughery to Sorin residents Wednesday.“Water to Sorin and Walsh was diverted to another pipe after the start of construction,” Loughery said in the email. “Though the pipe was able to handle that water usage during the summer, the pipe was not able to support the sudden surge in usage these past couple days.”In an email to Sorin and Walsh residents Wednesday, the Residential Life Team said Campus Utilities staff had been working throughout the day to restore water and would test the water “[o]ut of an abundance of caution.”Bottled water was delivered to the dorms to ensure access to potable water during testing. Badin and St. Edward’s Halls opened their bathrooms to Walsh and Sorin while their showers and toilets were impacted by the water outage.Brown said the University expects to receive the test results Friday afternoon.Tags: Construction, Sorin Hall, Walsh Hall, water outagelast_img read more

Tony Award winner Sutton Foster visits Saint Mary’s College

first_imgPhoto Courtesy of Hannah Toepp Renowned performer Sutton Foster answers questions Monday evening during an appearance at Saint Mary’s College.“We want to bring in well known Broadway powerhouses in order to motivate and inspire students in our musical theater minor” Mark Albin, the administrative assistant for communications, dance and theater department, said.Some of the other visitors have been women like Glenn Close, Audra McDonald and Sigourney Weaver, senior theater major Stephanie Johnson explained.Along with her question-and-answer session, Foster hosted a masterclass for students in which she discussed musical theater and helped students workshop their pieces.Albin explained that there were about 40 students — from Saint Mary’s, Notre Dame and local high schools — present in the masterclass.Johnson, who attended the masterclass and was able to sing for Foster, talked about the impact Foster’s visit had on her.“Theater has always been a part of my life,” Johnson said. “I think it’s valuable as a young artist to learn about the personal struggle of other artists. And it’s very inspiring to see someone who works against the stereotypes for female roles and allows women to be quirky or even gross without it being seen as a fault.”Foster’s presentation was an entertaining interview style. Foster said her own inspiration came from comic powerhouses like Lucille Ball and Carol Burnett.“In so many musicals, women are the victims. Their songs emphasize the sort of woe is me, I have nothing attitude. I just find that boring,” Foster said. “I want to see strength and action in female characters. I want characters who are ready to take their heartbreak and actively fight against it.”Foster also discussed the impact an actor can have on a role, and how a role can change the actor or actress.“There are a lot of cases where I end up changing the key a song is sung in. Or they end up changing a word because I can sing something else better,” she said. “I think a lot of people are afraid they won’t live up to someone else who played the role, but everyone brings something new to a role, and we’re just constantly working and figuring things out.”Foster ended the night with some advice for students who are about to graduate and move into the real world.“Be gentle and patient with yourselves. Your 20s are a decade of firsts, first house, first full time job, first love, first plant,” she said.She also had some advice on jobs and trying new things.“Don’t let rejection defeat you — let it fuel you,” Foster said. “Don’t think too much about what you’re going to do, just leap into your life. And then figure out.“ … Say yes to every opportunity that comes your way, except for porn.”Tags: Broadway, Margaret Hill Endowment, masterclass, Sutton Foster Saint Mary’s College community members, from professors to therapy dogs, filled O’Laughlin Auditorium Monday evening to see two-time Tony Award winning actress, singer and dancer Sutton Foster speak.Foster’s visit is the latest in a series of guest artists visits made possible by the Margaret Hill Endowment.last_img read more

NDPD works with Black students to release report on equitable practices

first_imgThe Notre Dame Police Development (NDPD) released an equity in policing report after receiving requests from students, faculty, staff and alumni.The report acknowledges NDPD’s role in the criminal justice system and the role law enforcement has played in the “dehumanization, oppression and the infringement of the basic civil and human rights of people in our country.”Written in collaboration with Black students at the University, the report not only pledged to hold NDPD accountable, but it also detailed a series of new and existing initiatives to prevent systemic racism.“We must be part of continued conversation and, as the police department entrusted with protecting and serving the Notre Dame community, we must always examine ourselves and take action to be the best we can be for all of Notre Dame,” the report said.Stand-alone de-escalation training was implemented this year to build upon previous de-escalation polices for enforcement. The training will be required at least every two years.“Enforcement is a tool that we will use if we must, but we would prefer to engage in problem solving, support, and partnership if these can resolve a situation safely,” the report said.NDPD also developed a policy to prevent dispatchers from sending officers to calls “based solely on suspicions about a person’s appearance.” Dispatchers are now trained to ask follow-up questions to determine whether there is also suspicious behavior before sending officers.In addition, the department committed to hiring a more diverse staff by expanding diversity recruitment initiatives.“We review our candidate pools with a diversity recruiter,” the report said. “We also have an internship program that has been utilized extensively by interns of color, some of whom have been hired into other police departments.”Following meetings this summer with members of the Diversity Council and other student clubs, NDPD created Unity Summits with the aim of improving relations between students and NDPD staff.NDPD will continue its training on implicit bias for law enforcement, which all officers are required to participate in every two years in addition to shorter refreshers. Many officers have also undergone training for trauma-informed sexual assault investigations and crisis intervention training. NDPD currently partners with other University offices to provide support and care for individuals experiencing a mental health crisis.Officers are not trained to use neck restraints or chokeholds, the report said. NDPD’s response to resistance policy requires officers to use force only when reasonable and to halt the use of force once “their lawful objective is attained.”“One of the guiding principles of our policy and training is the sanctity of every human life,” the report said. “Our policy also requires any officer who sees excessive use of force taking place to immediately protect the citizen and report the excessive force to a supervisor who shall then inform the Chief.”According to the report, NDPD used force a total of three times last year, where three of the subjects in the incidents were graduate students and the other three were not affiliated with the University. The instances must be reported when any implement of force including taser, pepper spray or handgun is drawn and verbal commands are given, the report said.The department also does not own riot gear or weaponry. NDPD does own clear shields and helmets “intended for use in rescuing injured people in an active violence situation;” however, they have never needed to use this equipment.All NDPD vehicles have cameras that officers must activate for any kind of enforcement action.“We also have numerous CCTV cameras which are reviewed whenever there is a complaint. All of our Tasers also have cameras built into them that automatically begin recording anytime the Taser is turned on,” the report said.In addition to their new procedures, NDPD committed to continue working with students, faculty and staff to adapt their policies to serve the Notre Dame community.“We must continue to provide an environment where students, faculty and staff, and guests and visitors can come and experience all that Our Lady’s University has to offer without fear,” the report said. “We must hold ourselves and each other to a higher standard and we must stand up for those who are unable or feel that they cannot stand for themselves.”Tags: NDPD, police brutality, Racismlast_img read more

Northwest Arena Closed To Public

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) File image by Justin Gould/WNYNewsNow.JAMESTOWN – As the coronavirus outbreak continues and in response to the New York State’s ban on gatherings over 50, the Northwest Arena announced its closing to the public.In a statement released Monday evening, the arena stated: “With increasing restrictions on social and recreational gatherings, Northwest Arena is temporarily closing the facility to the public effective today, Monday, March 16, at 8:00 p.m.”This statement continues, “This includes the walking track, senior skate, public ice skating, ice bumper cars, drop-in hockey, comedy shows, Weight Watchers, and yoga.” Other events including the home and garden show have also been cancelled. The beer and wine festival has been moved until late April.The facility will be open at limited times for pre-scheduled programming with limited capacity. Programming info can be found by calling the Northwest Arena at 716-484-2624. last_img read more

Congressman Reed Visits Jamestown Part Of Coronavirus Response

first_imgJAMESTOWN – Congressman Tom Reed is in Western New York today speaking with local officials about the novel Coronavirus response.Reed, during a Tuesday morning media conference, said his priority is helping those at the local level.The Congressman explains there are many moving parts in the effort to contain the virus, he says one of the biggest challenges is how the pandemic will impact health care facilities. Right now, his office is working to make resources available to locals.“I am very confident that we will be in a position to allocate resources that are needed if and when a situation develops,” said Reed. “My plan, and my hope, is still that we will avoid that and we will have a situation where people have taken the necessary social distancing measures and that we will have a situation two weeks from now that tremendously different because we know the date, we know where we stand.” Reed says communication between all levels of government is a key factor in controlling the outbreak. He urges community members to do their part by following guidelines from health officials. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Please look into factories who have a 1000 people on the floor . They told the office people to work from home but the poor floor workers are feeling expendable. Since they have closed beaches where there is open air. But factories the air from everyone is blowing on everyonelast_img read more

National Comedy Center Launches Online Platform Featuring Exhibit Content

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image by the National Comedy Center.JAMESTOWN – The National Comedy Center announced Thursday it has launched a new online content platform featuring exclusive content directly from its interactive comedy exhibits.Officials say the new program is an extension of the museum during its temporary closure due to COVID-19.Called the ‘National Comedy Center Anywhere’ the exhibit tells the story of comedy via commentary from the artists themselves, and rare archival material.“We want to enable our online visitors to explore the great works and unique voices that have shaped our culture through comedy,” said Journey Gunderson, National Comedy Center Executive Director. “Our mission is to provide education on the comedic arts in the form of commentary and contextualization of its bodies of work, while providing an examination of the time-honed creative processes that have elevated comedy to an art.” “Now is not the time to stop,” furthered Gunderson. “We need laughter more than ever.”The platform takes each visitor on a journey through the world of comedy, including stand-up, sketch and improv, late night TV, film, the latest online comedy, and more.In addition to footage from its interactive exhibits, the Comedy Center’s online platform will feature selections from its archives, including rare artifacts and documents from some of comedy’s greatest talent, along with special event highlights from its renowned Lucille Ball Comedy Festival and its National Comedy Center Dialogues.The platform will also be presenting live-streamed stand-up comedy shows in the coming weeks.“With the healing power of laughter more important than ever in these challenging times, we hope we can bring a taste of our unique National Comedy Center experience into your homes until we can re-open our doors and welcome visitors to Jamestown once again. In the meantime, National Comedy Center Anywhere is a virtual comedy hug for everyone who needs it right now, in addition to providing some much-needed support for our vital non-profit cultural institution,” added Gunderson.The platform features a selection of free material with the option to upgrade to access  more content from the museum. Upgraded access includes one additional gift access to share the laughter with a friend or family member, plus one admission ticket to the National Comedy Center visitor experience in Jamestown which can be used when the museum re-opens in the coming months.The $19.50 fee for upgraded access will support the mission and ongoing operations of the National Comedy Center during this critical time, while sharing comedy content with a friend or loved one.Visitors can begin their National Comedy Center Anywhere experience now, by visiting ComedyCenter.org/Anywhere.last_img read more

72-year-old Charged With DWI After Driving Off Embankment

first_imgWNY News Now Stock Image.SOUTH VALLEY – A 72-year-old Amherst man is facing DWI charges after driving his car off an embankment in Cattaraugus County on Wednesday.New York State Police allege Steven Obe was driving drunk when he failed to stop at the stop sign on Bone Run Road, continued across West Perimeter Road, drove over a guard rail and down the embankment.Troopers say Obe was uninjured in the crash.Obe, police say, was placed under arrest after failing several standardized field sobriety tests at the scene. At the New York State Police Barracks in Jamestown, police say Obe blew a breath sample of .10.Troopers say Obe was issued tickets and released. He is scheduled to appear in the Town of South Valley Court next month. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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