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Chilean and U.S. Air Forces Cooperate to Strengthen Aeromedical Evacuations

first_imgFor instance, two weeks after the seminar on aeromedical evacuations, a team of FACH physicians participated in joint disaster management exercises with the U.S. Air Force and Texas Air National Guard from April 20-28 in Texas. There, they performed mass aeromedical evacuations as well as airlifts for individual patients from cities in the context of a fictitious scenario in which a hurricane had struck a U.S. state. The training was conducted with critical care air transport teams (CCATT). By Dialogo May 19, 2015 The seminar was attended by 46 members of Chile’s Army, Navy, Air Force, Carabineros, Investigatory Police, representatives of Chile’s Metropolitan Emergency Mobile Medical Treatment System (SAMU), and a delegation consisting of 14 service members from the USAF and members of the Texas Air National Guard, said Colonel Alger Rodó, chief of the medical operations department at the FACH Health Division. Representatives from Chile’s critical care unit and Intensive Care Unit at the Military hospital also attended. The Chilean Air Force will send all of its physicians involved in medical evacuations of critical care patients for training in the CCATT course. The USAF “shared its experiences on precautions, reconnaissance and response to the Ebola virus,” Col. Rodó said. “We also had an Officer from the Uruguayan Army who was in Congo and spoke about managing the fatal virus (Ebola). The meeting helped us understand the challenges each organization had faced with its aeromedical evacuations and how they solved them. We also analyzed the elements on which we agreed, and the challenges in the future.” The seminar was attended by 46 members of Chile’s Army, Navy, Air Force, Carabineros, Investigatory Police, representatives of Chile’s Metropolitan Emergency Mobile Medical Treatment System (SAMU), and a delegation consisting of 14 service members from the USAF and members of the Texas Air National Guard, said Colonel Alger Rodó, chief of the medical operations department at the FACH Health Division. Representatives from Chile’s critical care unit and Intensive Care Unit at the Military hospital also attended. Meanwhile, the director of Metropolitan SAMU, Ximena Grove, discussed the work emergency medical personnel perform with the Armed Forces, focusing on recent medical evacuations conducted in the region of Atacama. On April 8, for instance, the FACH transported a 20-month-old child from the Copiapó Regiment to Pudahuel Air Base in Santiago; from there he was transferred to Dr. Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, also in the capital. The toddler was flown in a 9th Aviation Group UH-1H helicopter and subsequently by a 5th Aviation Group Cessna Citation CJ1 airplane. “It is always necessary to keep progressing,” Col. Rodó said. “This work is part of our DNA as an institution.” May this come trueWe all want peace, except for the bitter. Something has happened to make these groups so evil. Let us speak with them, a prison that offers rehabilitation. My comment is there are young people who want to serve in the military and you reject them. Iit should not be so, my son wanted to join the regiment and he was rejected. Now my son is really sad. We think it must be because he’s middle class or does he need to have money? “It is always necessary to keep progressing,” Col. Rodó said. “This work is part of our DNA as an institution.” “In the event of multiple accidents, the FACH has always been called upon to provide medical air transportation,” Col. Rodó said. “No other institution or private company has the ability to provide immediate transport for 20 or 30 patients.” For instance, two weeks after the seminar on aeromedical evacuations, a team of FACH physicians participated in joint disaster management exercises with the U.S. Air Force and Texas Air National Guard from April 20-28 in Texas. There, they performed mass aeromedical evacuations as well as airlifts for individual patients from cities in the context of a fictitious scenario in which a hurricane had struck a U.S. state. The training was conducted with critical care air transport teams (CCATT). “Twenty years ago, each institution used different equipment,” said Col. Rodó. “Now, there is interoperability in many activities; our equipment meets NATO standards, and this allows us to combine elements and obtain good results. It is in Chile’s interests to provide continual training to the Armed Forces as well as increase and improve its aeromedical evacuation capabilities.” “Twenty years ago, each institution used different equipment,” said Col. Rodó. “Now, there is interoperability in many activities; our equipment meets NATO standards, and this allows us to combine elements and obtain good results. It is in Chile’s interests to provide continual training to the Armed Forces as well as increase and improve its aeromedical evacuation capabilities.” The USAF “shared its experiences on precautions, reconnaissance and response to the Ebola virus,” Col. Rodó said. “We also had an Officer from the Uruguayan Army who was in Congo and spoke about managing the fatal virus (Ebola). The meeting helped us understand the challenges each organization had faced with its aeromedical evacuations and how they solved them. We also analyzed the elements on which we agreed, and the challenges in the future.” “In the event of multiple accidents, the FACH has always been called upon to provide medical air transportation,” Col. Rodó said. “No other institution or private company has the ability to provide immediate transport for 20 or 30 patients.” “Our relationship has seen an increase in the complexity of the training; now we are sending Chilean service members to participate in critical courses,” Col. Rodó said. Sharing medical protocols and information Retired Chilean Army Colonel Carlos Ojeda noted the value of the joint exercises. “These exercises allow us to perfect our teamwork skills, the interoperability of the Chilean Armed Forces, and to reinforce bilateral relationships with our partners to confront challenges to our security,” he said. The FACH evacuates about 20 or so critical patients each year, Col. Rodó said. Service Members who participated in the medical evacuations have been trained in aviation medicine and aircrew health. “Our team of physicians achieved all of the exercises’ objectives, and this demonstrates that our personnel are very well-trained,” Col. Rodó said. About 60 members of the Chilean Air Force (FACH) and the United States Air Force (USAF) recently met to strengthen aeromedical evacuation capabilities in aid of disaster victim, holding a seminar called “Challenges for Joint Aeromedical Evacuations” April 8-10 at the FACH Clinical Hospital in Santiago. About 60 members of the Chilean Air Force (FACH) and the United States Air Force (USAF) recently met to strengthen aeromedical evacuation capabilities in aid of disaster victim, holding a seminar called “Challenges for Joint Aeromedical Evacuations” April 8-10 at the FACH Clinical Hospital in Santiago. The FACH evacuates about 20 or so critical patients each year, Col. Rodó said. Service Members who participated in the medical evacuations have been trained in aviation medicine and aircrew health. “Our relationship has seen an increase in the complexity of the training; now we are sending Chilean service members to participate in critical courses,” Col. Rodó said. During the seminar, organizations demonstrated how they performed aeromedical evacuations — describing their procedures, techniques, equipment, training, and personnel for carrying out medical air transport — in an effort to learn from each other. FACH conducts exercises with Texas Air National Guard Recent medical evacuations discussed Recent medical evacuations discussed Meanwhile, the director of Metropolitan SAMU, Ximena Grove, discussed the work emergency medical personnel perform with the Armed Forces, focusing on recent medical evacuations conducted in the region of Atacama. On April 8, for instance, the FACH transported a 20-month-old child from the Copiapó Regiment to Pudahuel Air Base in Santiago; from there he was transferred to Dr. Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, also in the capital. The toddler was flown in a 9th Aviation Group UH-1H helicopter and subsequently by a 5th Aviation Group Cessna Citation CJ1 airplane. In one such instance, a C-130 Hercules airplane from the FACH 10th Aviation Group departed Pudahuel Air Base for Formosa, Argentina – approximately 1,500 kilometers from Santiago – to airlift 41 Chilean children, adolescents, and adults who were injured when a bus overturned while they were traveling back to Iquique from a championship soccer game in the city of Caraguatatuba, Brazil. Retired Chilean Army Colonel Carlos Ojeda noted the value of the joint exercises. “These exercises allow us to perfect our teamwork skills, the interoperability of the Chilean Armed Forces, and to reinforce bilateral relationships with our partners to confront challenges to our security,” he said. The Chilean Air Force will send all of its physicians involved in medical evacuations of critical care patients for training in the CCATT course. In one such instance, a C-130 Hercules airplane from the FACH 10th Aviation Group departed Pudahuel Air Base for Formosa, Argentina – approximately 1,500 kilometers from Santiago – to airlift 41 Chilean children, adolescents, and adults who were injured when a bus overturned while they were traveling back to Iquique from a championship soccer game in the city of Caraguatatuba, Brazil. The seminar continued a longstanding cooperative relationship between Chilean and U.S. security forces. Since 1995, the FACH has maintained regular joint relations with the Texas Air National Guard, sharing basic concepts such as how to place a patient properly on a stretcher to reduce transport times, to highly complex training. Sharing medical protocols and information “Our team of physicians achieved all of the exercises’ objectives, and this demonstrates that our personnel are very well-trained,” Col. Rodó said. FACH conducts exercises with Texas Air National Guard The seminar continued a longstanding cooperative relationship between Chilean and U.S. security forces. Since 1995, the FACH has maintained regular joint relations with the Texas Air National Guard, sharing basic concepts such as how to place a patient properly on a stretcher to reduce transport times, to highly complex training. During the seminar, organizations demonstrated how they performed aeromedical evacuations — describing their procedures, techniques, equipment, training, and personnel for carrying out medical air transport — in an effort to learn from each other. last_img read more

National Mini-Cadet, Pre-Cadet TT Championships

first_img… Billingy cops Mini-Cadet gold medalJASMINE Billingy emerged as the 2019 Girls’ 11-year-and-under (Mini-Cadet) national champion, when she battled past all opponents yesterday, on the opening day of the Guyana Table Tennis Association (GTTA) National Mini- and Pre-Cadet TT Championships, at Cliff Anderson Sports Hall.Billingy a tenacious hardworking and exceptional talent was outstanding in the round-robin finals played between herself, Akira Watson, Samara Sukhai and Quavana Torrington.The nine-year-old overcame the challenges of Watson, who finished second with an aggregate of one defeat and two wins, and Sukhai who won the bronze medal.Billingy, who will be one of Guyana’s selected athletes to the ITTF World Hopes Table Tennis training camp, will also lead Guyana’s charge at the Caribbean Pre-Cadet Table Tennis Championships scheduled for July 11-19 and 20-27 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.In the Boys’ Pre-Cadet (13-year-and-under division), the key favourite to take the title, national 15-and-under and 18-and-under Boys champion, Jonathan Van Lange, navigated his way safely in the group stages of the competition.Van Lange’s main rivals Krystian Sahadeo, Dhanesh Persaud and Colin Wong were also unbeaten in the group stage. Action continues tomorrow in the Pre-Cadet (Boys and Girls) and the Mini-Cadet (Boys).Tomorrow, the GTTA 15-and-under and 18-and-under Open Junior Challenge will serve off from 10:00hrs at the same venue.last_img read more

Intensity, leadership called into question after loss

first_imgAs Wisconsin’s men’s soccer team falls to 1-8-2 after dropping a thrilling Big Ten game to Michigan Sunday, the team’s intensity and energy level throughout games remains in question.Unlike some midweek non-conference games UW has played so far this season, the team started out Sunday’s showing amped-up due to the Big Ten weekend atmosphere of the game. However, head coach John Trask noted Wisconsin could not sustain this sense of urgency.After scoring 17 minutes into the game, UW allowed the talented attacking squad of Michigan to even the score before the half, and then take a commanding 3-1 lead 58 minutes in. Trask said the team looked uninspired from that point until finally scoring again with less than eight minutes remaining.“We’re not a team that can take not moments, but periods of time off,” Trask said. “It’s becoming a bit of a trend, and I think it’s the same when you’re not winning games. Every tackle hurts a little bit more. You know it was hot out today, next week it will be cold, and the next week it will be rainy and the next week it will be ‘the referee wasn’t on our side.’”Although the team looked especially motivated during the final minutes of play, with the Wolverines leading 3-2 and UW playing better than they had midweek, it still was not enough to earn a victory.Trask said he has tested his squad’s leadership and determination, but the players have not responded accordingly on the field come game time.“We don’t seem to be getting enough leadership out on the field, and I have challenged them,” Trask said. “I don’t care if it comes from the freshmen, the sophomores, the juniors [or] the seniors. We just look like we’re accepting defeat right now, and that’s disappointing. That’s something we’ve got to change. We’ve got to change that culture. We better do it in a hurry.”To adjust to this lack in energy level and confidence the 1-8-2 Badgers have experienced, players will have to find it within themselves to show up at games motivated and ready to go.“It can’t come from the sideline, it has to come from within the group,” Trask said. “I’m a firm believer in that. If it has to be manufactured by the pep band, or cheerleaders or coaches that are cheerleading, it’s false. At some point, they have to trust each other, they’ve got to fight through it themselves and they’ve got to hold each other accountable.”From a statistical standpoint alone, it appears as though the Badgers competed valiantly against the Wolverines, earning 10 corner kicks compared to Michigan’s four and taking 12 shots on goal. The Badgers failed, however, to maintain the lead or keep the necessary focus all 90 minutes to win the game.Junior defender/midfielder Colin Mani, who prompted a surge in confidence for Wisconsin with his first half goal echoed Trask’s advice, emphasizing the needs for individual commitment moving forward, especially for midweek games.“Every individual on the team needs to find [confidence] within themselves,” Mani said. “We have a lot of underclassmen and freshmen on our team, and so it’s new for them to have these midweek games. Just getting them the experience for that, the rest of us upperclassmen taking them on our shoulders and showing them the ropes, and then getting them onboard and pushing forward is key for those midweek games.”Mani recognized the leadership and dedication of senior defender/midfielder Aaron Nichols as a strong guide for younger players and veterans alike.“I think Aaron Nichols has done a great job [of emerging as a leader and showing the younger players the ropes to boost their intensity in games],” Nichols said. “He has been a key player for us all year. He gives us a real great attack through the right side of the field. He’s a great strength and we look to him for a lot of our attack.”Trask admitted the difficulties in approaching a game against such a strong opponent when your team has so little to show from its results thus far in the season.“It’s hard to find confidence when you’re walking into a game at 1-7-2,” Trask said. “We have to keep working on it because that’s sports. I mean, that is how you become a good team; you find it within yourself. We didn’t…It took us a long time, I felt, to really show consistent fight then.”last_img read more

Inderski Records A Career-High 21 Kills, But Volleyball Falls, 3-1

first_img Full Schedule Roster Next Game: Preview Buy Tickets Live Stats Watch Live Bradley 11/21/2015 – 3:00 PM The Valley on ESPN3 DES MOINES, Iowa – Drake’s Kyla Inderski (Urbandale, Iowa) recorded a career-high 21 kills but it was not enough to propel the Drake University volleyball team past visiting Loyola in a 3-1 loss Friday evening in the Knapp Center.Loyola (20-10, 9-8 MVC) held off the Bulldogs (14-20, 5-12 MVC) by set scores of 30-32, 25-14, 25-20, 25-16. Inderski’s 21 kills came off a career-high 62 attacks as she hit .226 in the loss and added 13 digs for her 15th double-double of the season. Makena Schoene (Seattle, Wash.) added 10 kills. Loyola, which has clinched its  spot in the MVC Championships, was led by Maureen Carls with 19 kills while her teammates Sami Hansen and Morgan Reardon tallied 13 each. Caroline Holt totaled 53 assists. The first set featured 16 ties and six lead changes before Drake was able to build up the two point lead necessary to beat Loyola 32-30. Schoene led the Bulldogs with six kills, followed by Inderski with three in the set that saw Drake open with a quick 8-4 lead.  Drake opened the second set with a pair of errors, allowing Loyola to have a two point lead to begin the set. Drake kept it close until Loyola had a 6-0 run to pull ahead by eight at 13-5. Loyola continued to hold its lead over the Bulldogs to win the set 25-14. Inderski tallied another four kills, while Katie Allen (Mokena, Ill.) had six. Loyola started with a 5-1 lead in the third set when Drake had a 4-0 run to tie the set behind Allen’s serves. Drake took its first lead, 13-12, since the first set after three-consecutive points behind Grace Schofield’s serving.  Loyola eventually took back the lead and did not relinquish it, winning the set 25-20. Inderski had eight kills along with Chandelle Davidson’s (Gretna, Neb.) seven assists. The fourth set continued to be close, but was eventually controlled by the Ramblers, who had an eight point or greater lead throughout most of the set. Drake briefly amassed a 4-0 run to cut into the lead, but despite six kills from Inderski the Bulldogs weren’t able to overtake the Ramblers’ lead. Loyola won the set 25-16 to defeat the Bulldogs, 3-1. The Bulldogs will finish their season Saturday afternoon against Bradley at 3 p.m. In the Knapp Center. The contest, which will serve as the Bulldogs’ ‘Senior Day’ will be broadcast on The Valley on ESPN3. Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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